The entire IbogaJourney experience is from Friday afternoon until Sunday afternoon, but the ceremony itself is from Friday evening until Saturday evening, and has three stages. The Death, The Transition and the Rebirth.

The Space


Guests arrive by 2 p.m. to the yurts, heated by wood stove and smudged, providing a welcoming and neutral field. It is a 30-foot circle lined with foam mattresses and centered by directional altar candles. Each guest chooses their location in the circle and sets up their bedding. Individual meetings are hosted with each participant throughout the afternoon, providing guidance and strengthening connection. All are welcome to tour the farm and the river after their meeting with the providers.
As the evening draws near, there will be less and less talking and after the opening circle, it is silent. Guests will be on their mats and, after respect is given to the Four Directions, we will pass the ‘talking stick,’ a first nations tradition allowing each in the circle presence and the opportunity to introduce and express. After this, the majority of the session is conducted in silence. Necessary communication will be as whispers, with respect to all in the space. Medicine offerings are gradual, allowing each person to acclimate slowly.

The Death


Natural, unaltered Iboga root bark will be offered gradually, every hour, for eight hours. This is a dedication to the Rite of Passage and is the invitation for the death of illusion. The more attachment there is to illusion, the more turbulent its death. This manifests as resistance and acceptance. Each layer peels away with acceptance, but it takes resistance first to break the surface. Each round is an opportunity to see this and to test courage and trust. Not only in the providers and the medicine, but in oneself. First resisting fear, then accepting it. Going beyond it.
The medicine will work its way through every cell, sending its energetic root system deep through the body and into the Earth. As each resistance finally gives way, it can be coupled with some form of purge. Often the greatest test is to continue taking rounds after purging. The offerings are very gradual, so sensitivities will show themselves and amounts will be adjusted so that all can continue to take medicine well into the night. There is no need to judge or measure rounds. How many and how much happen through relations with Deena and Jeremy. The amount of Iboga taken varies widely from guest to guest.

The Transition


There is no longer choice involved with the ending of the offerings. This gives rest to courage and beckons stillness. There is less whispering with providers, less purging and slowly, less intensity. Guests remain in a deep meditative state. Hyper-aware and awake, but still and silent. Emotions set free from the night before have a chance to express themselves, which can be hard but extremely rewarding. New pathways of non-resistance are formed so the mantra is ‘feel it to heal it’.
Emotional release comes in waves and without judgement, we accept the deeper purpose beyond momentary understanding. By mid-afternoon, a calming herbal tea will be served, followed by fruit when guests feel ready. As hydration and nutrition is replenished, standing and moving will become more comfortable, so its possible to sit outside for a short while late on Saturday afternoon. This unfolding takes place over the entire second day, and for some is more challenging than the offerings.

The Rebirth


Saturday can feel incredibly long but as night falls, there is a deep welcoming and relaxation. Stillness permeates to the core, simply there as existence itself. At this point, guests have been on their mats for close to 24 hours. The rebirth has a deeply important function. Bringing the body back from the ground as well as providing a connection to the Bwiti through their music. In Bwiti ceremonies, the music is always connected with movement, so it feels right to experience this. The mats are set aside and the group sits in a circle on the floor.
The magic sounds of the Mougongo begin to vibrate, eventually energizing guests to stand up. As the Bwiti music slowly rises in tempo, the circle will walk counter-clockwise and, for some, the walking may be rhythmical. Almost like jogging on the spot. It doesn’t matter how it’s done, just that an effort is given. The 45 minutes of music allows guests to shake off the cobwebs and feel blood pumping life into the muscles once again. After the music, a warm bowl of nurturing soup is offered as well as more fruit. The rebirth, hydration and nutrition all help the group finally get some rest that night.

Sunday Morning


On Sunday morning, the shower is available for guests’ use. Natural soap, shampoo and conditioner are provided. After showering, a full breakfast is served, starting with a replenishing smoothie. Following breakfast, the group will gather one last time to close the circle. In the closing, the ‘talking stick’ is once again shared and guests have the opportunity to reflect on their Journey.
This can be a profound impact, as guests become a mirror for one another. The closing circle ends the collective energy created and is the beginning of the solo voyage integrating Iboga’s frequency and watching as the teachings unfold through life experience.